Angus Ribeye Steak Au Poivre w/ Balsamic Reduction

Last Wednesday, I prepared one of the dishes that should have been part of my luxurious dinner party had I advanced to round 3 of Project Food Blog 2010. My menu would have consisted of moules a la mariniere, salad skewers, bananas foster (gosh, with flambe!), and of course, this dish. I was so tempted to continue with my dinner on the same day that round 3 started, but I opted not to. Anyhow, those dishes are still on my to-do list and you’ll see them posted around here soon 🙂

Last week, I visited my uncle who was confined at a hospital. Before heading home, we went to their house inside Camp Crame (my aunt happens to be the 2nd female General of the country) and I was surprised to see lots of Angus ribeye literally freezing in their ref! Well, actually I shouldn’t be surprised because my cousin’s a chef and runs a restaurant and a catering business. Anyhow, without much effort to give a hint that I would love some Angus ribeyes, she gave me four 8-oz. 3/4″ thick cuts!

You should have seen how my eyes lit with so much joy! 😛

And it’s steak time, baby!

Here’s my first crack at steaks ~ my take on the damn-melt-in-your-mouth Ribeye Steak Au Poivre with Balsamic Reduction 🙂

 

I got the recipe from Epicurious.com and I had a little adjustment to it.

Ingredients:

  • two pieces 6-8 oz. ribeye (no bone), about 3/4 to 1 inch thick
  • 2 heaping tablespoons whole peppercorn, crushed
  • 1 heaping teaspoon ground pepper
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1/2 cup balsamic vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • salt to taste

If your meat is frozen like mine, you have to thaw it, remove all the water content, and pat dry. Your steaks should be at room temperature so that it gets cooked easier.

 

 

Next, crush your whole peppercorns and mix it with the ground black pepper and olive oil. Rub the mixture on each side of the meat. Wrap each steak with cling wrap and set aside for at least 2 to 3 hours before you cook.

Also, bear in mind that fresh red meat is just one thing in a steak, the right way of cooking it is another. In view of that, let me show you this very informative video on how to cook a steak and determine the right “wellness.”

Now, you’re ready to cook. 🙂

Get an iron cast pan or any thick pan. Turn heat to high so that  the pan gets hot quick. Make sure that the pan is really hot before you put your steaks in. When the pan is hot, turn the heat to medium and drop your butter. Then, immediately put in your steaks.

As a rule of thumb, if you want your steak rare, cook it for about a minute each side; medium rare is for two minutes, medium well is for three minutes, and well done is for four minutes.

 

You can serve it as is. Just spoon up some butter from the pan to glaze your steak. OR (and this is my favorite part), you can do a balsamic vinegar reduction.

After you’ve taken out the meat from the pan, pour in your balsamic vinegar. Let it reduce to about 1/3 of its original volume. When the vinegar is reduced, add salt to taste. Spoon up your balsamic reduction and pour on top of the steak.

 

Serve with your favorite side dish. Mine is button potatoes that I boiled and tossed into the same balsamic reduction.

Sans the table setting that should have been made more beautiful by a luxurious centerpiece, elegant plates, expensive silverware, and typically all the glitz and glamor of a fancy dinner, I’d say that a good steak will always be a winner and it would take all that hullaballoo to match one.

As I always say to myself when I eat something truly delicious… close your eyes and go ooopmh!

Or you can end the “oomph” with a curse. More like “Oomph. F@#$, this is soooo good.” 😛

 

P.S.

One steak sums up to about 540 calories and since I’m on a pact to go on a diet along with my friends Cherie and Charade, I only ate half. Hubby’s the happiest person.

I’d also like to thank my friend Paola for recommending this dish.

And of course, I’d like to thank my uncle and aunt for the Angus beef. I still got two left btw 🙂

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8 thoughts on “Angus Ribeye Steak Au Poivre w/ Balsamic Reduction

  1. michelinstarfinedinings says:

    Steak purists won’t like this, Lol. Just kidding. As much as I love the purist way of not seasoing my steak (other than fleur de sel), especially with a nice dry aged piece of steak, as much I do love steak au poivre (especially with filet mignon)

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